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Writer One
February 10th, 2015, 03:06 PM
:-k Other than the title, what chasmatic words could be used to draw the reader into the post? To me the title names the posts subject, but to keep the reader interested in the post it would seem chasmitic words are necessary. All of my post always point toward the title, and to make a point I also use (parenthesis) and underlines. I was going to use hyperlinks, but that might distract the reader. Thoughts? curious Paul

LeeC
February 10th, 2015, 04:26 PM
I apologize if I'm missing the point here, but it's difficult to see where you're going with this.

To introduce a story, embark on making a point, or just try to get other's attention when asking a question, it goes without saying that the title/label is the first step in catching an eye. To ask what specific words to use in such is an overgeneralization, as it depends on the material presented.

Following that thought, within the material presented, the words used are what distinguish a real wordsmith from a layperson.

For example, what caught my eye with your title was the seemingly made up word "Chasmatic" (maybe you meant chasmic, or chasmically). I get the idea, as in what can I say that's profound, but not an auspicious attempt. Then your thoughts seem to take a tangent in remarking how your posts don't diverge from the title/label, which to me seemed contradictory. In addition, I can't grasp why you even referenced hyperlinks, as such would seem to me to be applicable to supportive citation where needed.

You really didn't present much for a well-meaning reader to get their teeth into, but you asked for thoughts. I hope this helps in some small way :-)

JustRob
February 10th, 2015, 04:53 PM
I take it that you are referring to words in the text of the posting rather than the title, which has limited space. That said, even the title text can contain an extra element to draw the reader in. Here's an example with the title of a chapter of my novel as posted on this website.


NUAT - Chapter 1 - 5320 words (Suggestive scantily-clad girl -- is disappointed)


Here I have actually abbreviated the story title to its initials to make room for the other information, in particular the appropriate warning about there being some suggestive erotic content, which might just put off some readers, but the final two words are there to provide a narrative hook indicating the direction that the action takes away from the erotic. It isn't essential because people may look at the internal text anyway.

Within the internal text there is the much more powerful narrative hook, so powerful that it was what forced me to write the novel in the first place just so that I could read it myself.


Three clocks hang on the office wall.
The white one has stopped. The black one keeps ticking on.
Above them the red one is going backwards.
The fairy tale has started.



The words themselves are nothing special but they suggest conflicting time distortions and fantasy, enough to raise the reader's curiosity.
This particular hook was a flook, not something that I could have created on purpose. The only suggestion that I can make is that the charismatic words that will persuade the reader to start reading your work are the ones that have or would have persuaded you to start writing it, so put that sentiment into words concisely and you have your hook.

The opening words are always an important hook in a story. I once bought a book because the opening sentence simply read "She was naked." Too little information and yet just enough. Ah, she was riding a white horse bareback across the Camargue. I didn't even look at the price.

Writer One
February 10th, 2015, 09:11 PM
:wink2:Well said, both of you. curious Paul

Sam
February 10th, 2015, 10:48 PM
What is chasmatic?

A huge hole? Compelling charm?

I have no idea what you're referring to, because 'chasmatic' isn't a word.

J Anfinson
February 10th, 2015, 11:13 PM
I think he means "charismatic".

That's where good description comes in, I think, but not overdoing it. If your writing is bland from repeating words, then you might consider using a thesaurus to help you remember other suitable words. Just don't use any word you find though, unless you're sure of the meaning. Some consider that a terrible idea but I find it helps at times.

Writer One
February 11th, 2015, 12:11 AM
Leec
I see something I didn't see before, the word contradictory. I ask questions to get answers, different answers give me more information about the questions with many and different answers, then I can pick the best answer to the question. Thank you for that insite. curious Paul Thoughts?

Writer One
February 11th, 2015, 12:29 AM
:-k Justrob,
I ask many questions and get many answers and use the best answer logically. I know why I do that. Philosophy, rational reasoning and logic. curious Paul

Writer One
February 11th, 2015, 12:42 AM
J Anfinson (http://www.writingforums.com/members/50651-J-Anfinson),
Thesaurus, visual thesaurus is my bible for finding words and there meaning. Thank you. curious Paul

Morkonan
February 11th, 2015, 12:58 AM
:-k Other than the title, what chasmatic words could be used to draw the reader into the post? To me the title names the posts subject, but to keep the reader interested in the post it would seem chasmitic words are necessary. All of my post always point toward the title, and to make a point I also use (parenthesis) and underlines. I was going to use hyperlinks, but that might distract the reader. Thoughts? curious Paul

I think the phrase you're looking for is "Power Words" rather than "Charismatic Words."

You can use a simple Google search to find what some people call "Power Words:" Let Me Google That For You: "Power Words" (http://lmgtfy.com/?q=power+words)

While some Power Words innately draw attention to themselves, it's the skill of the writer in using them that is important. Writers combine words in order to communicate and, if done well, it's the skill evident in the overall composition rather than any one word that succeeds at communicating the writer's intent or gains the interest of the reader.

There are, however, ways to communicate things in simple "titles" that are more effective than others. That's where the use of Power Words can help. But, their use in that regard is usually due to competition - Newspapers want eye-catching headlines because their competition is sitting on the rack, right beside them.

For a forum post, however, what you want to do is to be sure that your title is descriptive. If you wish your title to be "eye catching", take care - People will click on eye-catching titles, but they'll more often return to ones that are clear and easy to understand. For myself, I find that I can't remember what thread a particular conversation is because the titles I see on the page don't match the substance of the opening post... :)

Word your thread titles descriptively, making them relevant to the thread's content, and don't use anything more than simple punctuation. Schemes to attract attention are easily discernible and will put off some readers because of that. People will respond to your threads if not only the title is truly indicative of something they find interesting, but the opening post is as well.

Note: Threads on forums aren't like articles in newspapers. We're a community of like-minded individuals, recreationally engaging each other on topics of mutual interest. The atmosphere here is more like a pub or a public meeting house than a newspaper stand - None of us are competing with each other for an audience.

Blade
February 11th, 2015, 01:13 AM
While some Power Words innately draw attention to themselves, it's the skill of the writer in using them that is important. Writers combine words in order to communicate and, if done well, it's the skill evident in the overall composition rather than any one word that succeeds at communicating the writer's intent or gains the interest of the reader.:sunny:

A real risk in becoming overly focused on 'power words' is that words in general circulation can become overused, lose their original impact, and eventually become empty and eventually irritating. A particular word can also become dated (i.e. groovy, swell) and come across as quaint rather than providing impact.

My favorite 'dead word' at present is 'iconic'.:pukel:

Morkonan
February 11th, 2015, 01:28 AM
...My favorite 'dead word' at present is 'iconic'.:pukel:

I was talking to a friend about his company the other day and he was going on and on about the necessity of being seen as "crushing it." ie: That salesman really crushed it! He took that project on and crushed it! He crushes everything!

I felt like I was back in the 80's... Outstanding paradigm shift!

(I abuse the exclamatory version of the word "outstanding" pretty often in posts... Gotta stop doing that. "Crushing!" - That's what I'll be using, from now on. :) )

Blade
February 11th, 2015, 01:40 AM
I was talking to a friend about his company the other day and he was going on and on about the necessity of being seen as "crushing it." ie: That salesman really crushed it! He took that project on and crushed it! He crushes everything!

I felt like I was back in the 80's... Outstanding paradigm shift!

(I abuse the exclamatory version of the word "outstanding" pretty often in posts... Gotta stop doing that. "Crushing!" - That's what I'll be using, from now on. :) )

I kind of like 'crushed it' too. I can hardly wait to use it somewhere.:triumphant: In any case individual words and phrases can become overused and eventually ridiculous.:distrust:

J Anfinson
February 11th, 2015, 02:04 AM
"Crushing!" - That's what I'll be using, from now on. :) )

A smashing idea!

JustRob
February 11th, 2015, 10:28 AM
I'd rather use key words than power words. Key words unlock a whole range of possibilities, inviting the reader to explore them with you. I'm not sure that they'd be found amongst the power words. I'm thinking of words like "diversity" and "dimension", words that widen horizons rather than focussing the mind. There is a scene in my novel (Isn't there always?) where someone is trying to unlock encrypted files on a computer. When the computer asks for the password she can only think "I have the key". trying to convince herself that she can work out the password, but it isn't necessary because the computer detects that thought and opens the files anyway, knowing that she is in the right state of mind to receive the new information. That's what we need to do at the outset, get the reader into the right state of mind to appreciate what we have written subsequently.

My curiosity was engaged by "chasmatic" as well. I have no problem with people plucking new words out of thin air along with all their other wild ideas. When the spelling checker reprimands me and the dictionaries all back it up I still decide for myself whether my newborn word should live. In the opening chapter of my novel (!) I used "hyphephilial" which sent a respected doctor of English literature scrambling for his dictionary. I don't think the word really exists but the reader can work out what it would mean if it did, so it's good enough. Oddly including it gave the sentence the right rhythm, which is a strange thing to be considering when writing prose, but there must have been something happening there at the back of my mind.

My favourite newborn pet in my novel (sorry again) is "bananamarine", a bent submarine that is doomed to travel in perpetual circles. It's torpedoes do as well, a characteristic which eventually seals its fate of course ...

With that parting thought and having fired off a salvo myself I will do likewise and remove myself from this thread.

Blade
February 11th, 2015, 07:12 PM
My curiosity was engaged by "chasmatic" as well. I have no problem with people plucking new words out of thin air along with all their other wild ideas. When the spelling checker reprimands me and the dictionaries all back it up I still decide for myself whether my newborn word should live. In the opening chapter of my novel (!) I used "hyphephilial" which sent a respected doctor of English literature scrambling for his dictionary. I don't think the word really exists but the reader can work out what it would mean if it did, so it's good enough. Oddly including it gave the sentence the right rhythm, which is a strange thing to be considering when writing prose, but there must have been something happening there at the back of my mind.

:sunny: There seems to be two classes of created words. One that is baffling and sends you to the dictionary to try to confirm or deny (](*,)) and the other where the word is obviously synthetic but the meaning is evident.

One I have come across is 'catfooding', the act of eating food directly out of a can.

Morkonan
February 12th, 2015, 08:09 PM
...One I have come across is 'catfooding', the act of eating food directly out of a can.

Awesome! A potential Shakespearism, there!

I am going to buy a can of something and eat out of it, just so I can tell my friends that I was "catfooding" for dinner, tonight!

It doesn't actually have to be cat food, does it? :)

Blade
February 12th, 2015, 08:21 PM
Not catffod! Something eaten directly out of a can like a cart would.

Yumi Koizumi
February 16th, 2015, 10:32 PM
I'll admit to being the stupid one who thought the OP was talking about Charismatic...