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TJ1985
January 17th, 2015, 10:12 AM
Thanks to a forum friend, I've been wandering through writing poetry. I made an unusual discovery that's given me a lot to think about.

Every poem I start seems to always end up taking on a romantic feel. Not so deeply that it comes off lurid or grotesque, but I find myself coming up with hundreds of ideas for romantic poems, and fewer than a dozen for non-romantic ones. Lost love, new love, found love, old love, hot love, timid love, steamy, sultry, fiery, mundane, and many others that I'm not really sure if I'd be willing to describe in a public space, or in front of ladies. (Sorry, I'm an old-fashioned kind of guy.)

I'm not so naive that I don't know what this means. It means I need to get... out more. :D

I'm curious whether this is a common discovery that others have noticed in themselves. I'm sure it speaks volumes about my mental state, but my other writing doesn't tend to get steamy at all.

It may be that I've always subconsciously felt that poetry was more tilted in that direction, seducing, craving, but the last twenty I've read, ice cold and not relevant to romance at all. Meanwhile, my wacky mind doesn't seem to know any other topic, and that confuses me.

Thoughts?

Olly Buckle
January 17th, 2015, 11:55 AM
I was looking at my short stories and realised that I nearly always startout with a thing that triggers them, photo booths, longbows, a teatowel, a homo erectus fossil, and so on. They lead on into human relationships, but it is never what triggers them.
Have you considered writing song lyrics? That does seem to be their main subject.

Firemajic
January 17th, 2015, 12:44 PM
A lot of poets shy away from writing about the warm fuzzy romantic love poems, afraid that the poem can go oh so cliché... Julia

aj47
January 17th, 2015, 12:59 PM
Sometimes I get in situations where I'm writing about the same thing. Usually, though, if it's not baseball or my husband, it's because I have something I have to work out. Once I get there, then my pieces about it stop. Maybe there's a specific thing you need to work out.

Bloggsworth
January 17th, 2015, 01:11 PM
Don't fight it.

TJ1985
January 17th, 2015, 01:33 PM
Don't fight it.

That's what the nurse kept telling me about the restraints...

I concur Julia, it is coming off very cliched and... predictable. But I'll sort it out one way or another. ;)

Firemajic
January 17th, 2015, 01:43 PM
If you want to write love poems, there is nothing wrong with that. Just say it in a new and unique way. Make me FEEL it in a new and different way. Avoid " her eyes sparkled like diamonds, her lips like cherry wine, and I noticed when she walked away---she had a great behind! Cliché ! [lol]

TJ1985
January 17th, 2015, 01:51 PM
Avoid " her eyes sparkled like diamonds, her lips like cherry wine, and I noticed when she walked away---she had a great behind! Cliché ! [lol]

Really? Damn. <crumples paper> I'll try again...

"Roses are red
violets are blue.
There's nothing on TV
Why can't we screw"

Better?

Firemajic
January 17th, 2015, 02:05 PM
[-X ](*,) :coffeescreen: yes! much--much better....

Bloggsworth
January 17th, 2015, 05:42 PM
Love poems take many forms and need not be about erotic or sexual love, nor clichéd. My best love poem is probably this:


In Loco Absentium

Where once we walked in sunlight
are shadows, acorns thrown
now grown to trees - and this,
the grove where we two stood
and spoke of love is silent;
neither breeze nor bird disturb.
I rest here, between sweet briar
and celandine, not for pleasure,
but in remembrance.

Bloggsworth
January 17th, 2015, 07:48 PM
The title of the poem confuses Google translate, it means "In the place of the absent", but Google translates the Latin into English as "Put in absentia." However, if you write "In the place of the absent", and ask Google to translate it into Latin, it comes up with, as it should, In loco absentium - Curious.

TJ1985
January 17th, 2015, 07:51 PM
It's still a beautiful poem, despite what Google tried to do to it. ;)

I've essentially discovered that I must write the words that come to me. Not everyone will think of me the same because of them, but I'd rather be true to myself and do what felt right than try and balance and juggle to please everyone.

Bloggsworth
January 17th, 2015, 11:01 PM
It's still a beautiful poem, despite what Google tried to do to it. ;)

I've essentially discovered that I must write the words that come to me. Not everyone will think of me the same because of them, but I'd rather be true to myself and do what felt right than try and balance and juggle to please everyone.

Absolutely.

escorial
January 17th, 2015, 11:16 PM
writing poetry releases the mind

Mondestrunken
January 18th, 2015, 10:41 AM
I seem to do most of my poetry writing when I'm feeling the exact opposite. I did my most productive poetry writing at times in my life when I felt very bitter and angry at the opposite sex. This is probably why I haven't written much poetry lately, as I've been in a happy relationship for going on 4 years now.

I can say I've written a few romantic poems, though. Honestly, now that I think about it, I've written a poem or two about every man I've been involved with, even if it never progressed to dating. I guess there's just something about emotional (and physical!) attraction that brings out the poet in all of us.

TJ1985
January 18th, 2015, 11:19 AM
I concur. I tend to find myself continually stirred by old thoughts that creep back in to my process. If they come back so easily, it makes me wonder if they ever really left. ;)

Olly Buckle
January 18th, 2015, 11:23 AM
Really? Damn. <crumples paper> I'll try again...

"Roses are red
violets are blue.
There's nothing on TV
Why can't we screw"

Better?
This should be here :)
http://www.writingforums.com/threads/143950-Roses-are-red

QDOS
January 20th, 2015, 08:58 PM
My peculiar discovery was turning to verse as a distraction whenever I reached an impasse with my fictional writing. The subject matter was and is almost on anything, from morbid curiosity of the undead, smoking, listening to rock music, expletive expressions, phonetics and pronunciation, aspects of grammar, biscuits, my feet, tech support, speech recognition, even about my writing of this rhyming release. Oh! Yes, romance and the consequences of desire.

Winds of Desire
There was love and sweet,
In flames of passions heat,
Embracing as if delighted,
Bodies locked, souls united,
A brief moment of concession,
Lost to another’s possession,
From which a seed was sown,
A responsibility they now disown,
To emotions that brightly burns,
And without notice quickly turns,
Not yet the arrows of Cupids Fire,
These are just the Winds of Desire.

QDOS

Blade
January 20th, 2015, 09:12 PM
I concur. I tend to find myself continually stirred by old thoughts that creep back in to my process. If they come back so easily, it makes me wonder if they ever really left. ;)

I don't think the mind wants to (or is able to) simply discard ideas that were once considered paramount. A certain way of looking at things might be superseded by something new and old attitudes pushed aside, but never very far. The right mood or experience can draw the old template back as a 'backup plan'.

I think the adage 'man is by nature conservative' derives from this. Once something is put in place and seems to be doing the job it is quite difficult to dislodge. The risk of change has to fight the past, usually in more than one episode.