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SouthernRiver4
February 24th, 2013, 05:17 PM
If I could get this pinned to the top, that'd be sick! But I think that this would be a popular enough thread that it will stay on top, anyway.

So basically, this is just a thread for anyone who does audio engineering either professionally, semi-professionally, or amateur.

Talk about your equipment, your projects, give tips and advice, and discuss all things engineering!

Bloggsworth
February 24th, 2013, 07:03 PM
Since the early 70s I have built my own loudspeakers, I have been using my third pair for the last 30+ years, having sold the previous 2 pairs at a profit (both are still in use as far as I know). I have an Linn LP12 which is 30 years old and will outlive me, Yaqin valve power amplifier, Croft valve pre-amplifier, Creek tuner and Marantz CD player + about 700 LPs and 100s of CDs. I built my own FM tuner in the early 70s, using a Practical Wireless design, which, using an indoor TV aerial in London, I could receive French FM stations, unfortunately when the Mullard decoder failed, I could no longer get a spare, so it had to go.

When my daughter's friends of the iPod generation come round, I enjoy letting them feel what true bass reproduction really is, they can't get over the shaking floorboards!

4285

Note the pyramid shape some 10 years before the big names cottoned on to the advantages of no internal standing waves. Sorry about the quality of the picture.

SouthernRiver4
February 24th, 2013, 07:08 PM
Since the early 70s I have built my own loudspeakers, I have been using my third pair for the last 30+ years, having sold the previous 2 pairs at a profit (both are still in use as far as I know). I have an Linn LP12 which is 30 years old and will outlive me, Yaqin valve power amplifier, Croft valve pre-amplifier, Creek tuner and Marantz CD player + about 700 LPs and 100s of CDs. I built my own FM tuner in the early 70s, using a Practical Wireless design, which, using an indoor TV aerial in London, I could receive French FM stations, unfortunately when the Mullard decoder failed, I could no longer get a spare, so it had to go.

When my daughter's friends of the iPod generation come round, I enjoy letting them feel what true bass reproduction really is, they can't get over the shaking floorboards!

4285

Note the pyramid shape some 10 years before the big names cottoned on to the advantages of no internal standing waves. Sorry about the quality of the picture.

Words cannot describe how dumb I feel. I need to get ahold of a engineering/audio vocabulary sheet. And probably study up on brand names...TO THE INTERNET. *opens new tab*

Bloggsworth
February 24th, 2013, 09:24 PM
Yaqin is Chinese, 50+50 watt, EL34 valves (tubes as you are American), best buy I've ever had, 126 ($192) off Ebay including shipping from Hong Kong to the UK, sweet as a nut these last 6 years - They are still available for $400 to $500 + shipping. The LP12 is the stuff of legends, the Croft is an amp which is hand-built in the UK; the Creek tuner was made not 1/2 mile from where I live in North London.

CharlieTooHuman
November 6th, 2013, 02:34 PM
Since the early 70s I have built my own loudspeakers, I have been using my third pair for the last 30+ years, having sold the previous 2 pairs at a profit (both are still in use as far as I know). I have an Linn LP12 which is 30 years old and will outlive me, Yaqin valve power amplifier, Croft valve pre-amplifier, Creek tuner and Marantz CD player + about 700 LPs and 100s of CDs. I built my own FM tuner in the early 70s, using a Practical Wireless design, which, using an indoor TV aerial in London, I could receive French FM stations, unfortunately when the Mullard decoder failed, I could no longer get a spare, so it had to go.

When my daughter's friends of the iPod generation come round, I enjoy letting them feel what true bass reproduction really is, they can't get over the shaking floorboards!

4285

Note the pyramid shape some 10 years before the big names cottoned on to the advantages of no internal standing waves. Sorry about the quality of the picture.

Those look amazing! Wish I knew how to make my own. Are you a professional sound engineer or is this something you learned on your own?

Bloggsworth
November 6th, 2013, 03:11 PM
Those look amazing! Wish I knew how to make my own. Are you a professional sound engineer or is this something you learned on your own?

Started life as a car mechanic and worked my way up to Managing Director of a plastic moulding company, self-taught loudspeaker builder. The factory made its own patterns for moulding tools, and among the kit was a 36" diameter disc sander, a great help when making speakers!

I was originally going to buy some and was attending a demo in a HiFi shop when I turned to the owner and said "This is pointless, as all the other speakers add their bit when their resonant frequencies are hit", so I went away and bought the drivers and crossover bits, used the manufacturers specs to get the right volume for the cabinets and went ahead - Fun maths working out the volume of the pyramidal speaker! My first pair of bookshelf speakers I sold to a work colleague who wanted them as extensions for his AR9s, he came back after the weekend and told me that my speakers were in his living room and the ARs relegated to the kitchen as extension speakers, they are now in Vancouver. The next, floorstanding, pair I sold to someone who took them to Florida, back to France, then England, then Alabama and back to London; they are now in Leicester and still going strong after 30 years...