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View Full Version : (C.7) The Obsolete and Primitive Body – Part 2



vcnavega
December 17th, 2012, 12:54 PM
“Are you ready to tell me more about your health problems?”

“Well, I’d rather talk about my mum’s health problems, we always took turns with it, you know, sometimes it was me going to the hospital, sometimes it was her. So, since last time it was my turn, let’s talk about her now.”

“Okay, Vilminha, as you like.”

“After her heart got fixed I thought ‘That’s it. We’ve got it, now she will be okay’. But I was wrong. Everything was okay, we were moving on with our lives, but suddenly out of the blue she couldn’t walk. Her left leg got really bad arthrosis. It became so stiff and big, she couldn’t move it, and she seemed to be in so much pain, I had to call an ambulance. My house is really big and her bedroom is on the third floor, it was really hard to bring her downstairs and place her in the ambulance. There wasn’t much they could do for her at the hospital. Her condition wasn’t treatable, well, most cases are treatable, but not hers.”

“Why not?”

“They couldn’t perform a surgery on her knee, not at her age, and not with her heart condition. And the only medicine recommended to treat arthrosis is an anti-inflammatory, which is a medicine that people who are using anti-clotting medicines can’t take.”

“Anti-clotting medicines? Sorry, dear, I am lost. You seem to know so much about all these conditions.”

“I told you, Sam, I had to take a speed course. Due to my mum’s heart condition, that atrial fibrillation, she must take a medicine that controls how her blood clots, otherwise she might have a stroke or a heart attack. This medicine doesn’t work well when people take anti-inflammatories. So, in order to fix her leg she should take an anti-inflammatory, but she couldn’t, it would affect her heart.”

“Oh, I see, I understand it now. So, what did you do?”

“Nothing, as we say in Portuguese and Spanish ‘nada’. They let us leave the hospital, and her health insurance plan didn’t allow us to take an ambulance. I called her physiotherapist and my niece, and they helped me to bring her back home, but you wouldn’t believe how hard it was for the three of us to take her to her bedroom, and to go up on those three staircases. It was insane, looking back we laugh, but it wasn’t funny at all.”

“So, what happened then?”

“She couldn’t walk. She couldn’t move. She remained in pain, suffering like hell. There wasn’t any relief I could bring to her.”

“Vilminha, that’s horrible.”

“I know, I know, I know. I was powerless, but I tried to do all I could. I placed ice packs on her knee, I cooked for her, brought her three meals a day and snacks in bed, and bathed her. I did everything for weeks, maybe months. I think it was two months, maybe three, I don’t recall. I myself was sleeping on the floor near her bed, and that room is so hot, the sunlight falls on her window all day… it was insane, insane, insane…”

“Vilminha, are you okay?”

“Oh, sorry, Sam. Yes, I am. Sorry, I am all right. It is just that at that time I thought that my life would be like that forever. I was bound to take care of my mum for the rest of my life.”

“But eventually she got better?”

“She did. Out of the blue, as if nothing had happened. And my mum is like that, you know, when she was okay she started cooking again, and I said she was dancing samba. When my brother Eduardo calls from America asking how mum is doing I always say ‘She is dancing samba.’ He knows what I mean, because when he is here, she drives him crazy too, he doesn’t like to see her acting like this, as if she was young. Sometimes she doesn’t realize how old she is.”

“She must enjoy being alive.”

“She enjoys life. But again, some months later... no, if I recall it was more than that... a year or so... she had another problem, something more difficult, actually.”

“What was that?”

“Her physiotherapist was here, and she always does her exercises so beautifully, I always watch them doing those exercises. She practiced Yoga most of her life, and she applies the knowledge she got from Yoga in her physiotherapy. But I realized she wasn’t performing that well, and at some point she wasn’t talking coherently, so I said to the guy ‘Can’t you see my mum is having a stroke?’ and he said, ‘I suppose so, let’s run to the hospital right now.’”

“Oh, I am sorry to hear that.”

“That’s okay, Sam. It wasn’t a stroke, thank God. It was a urinary infection, and she was acting like that because of the fever, a high one, and it was affecting her brain. But they didn’t know that at the hospital, so they had to run many exams and tests, and they admitted her to the IUC, and for me that was hell. If I can’t stay with my mum, that is hell. When they found out what was going on with her they moved her to a regular room, and I was able to stay with her. But it was claustrophobic for both of us.”

“Why?”

“It takes 7 days to heal most kinds of infection, but with that horrible food they served at the hospital, she got diarrhea and they wouldn’t let us go back home without fixing that, even though I knew it was their food. They wouldn’t let us go home.”
“We remained in that hospital for weeks, almost a month, and the diarrhea got worse and worse. She got dehydrated, and those stupid nutritionists don’t know anything about being a vegetarian, they were killing my mum and me, it was insane, insane, insane…”

“Oh, Vilminha, I am so sorry.”

“I know, I know, I know. Eventually, after I begged them to let us leave, they relented, and after the first meal she got at home her diarrhea was gone. The stupid nutritionists almost killed my mum!”

“You are pretty sure about that, aren’t you?”

“I am and I think they also knew it, and they let us leave for my mum to die at home, but they didn’t know I’d feed her properly at home. The stupid nutritionists almost killed my mum!”

“Relax, Vilminha, relax. Here, take, my chest.”

“Yes, Sam, yes. Please, give me your chest.”