PDA

View Full Version : My Map



Justinian
September 24th, 2012, 06:08 PM
This is my map for my book

HKayG
September 24th, 2012, 06:28 PM
Is that writing yours? It's very pretty!

Nemesis
September 24th, 2012, 06:40 PM
The edges are a little too jagged all over, maybe smooth a few of ever so slightly to mimic real continents (not to make it look just like them but to add realism)

Justinian
September 24th, 2012, 06:59 PM
I drew the map on a piece of paper, scanned it to photoshop, added the old paper look and font, as well as color, and saved it as a photo.
Also, thank you for the criticism. Do you mean that I should round the edges of the continents some more, or thin the line?

Nemesis
September 24th, 2012, 07:03 PM
Round just a little, keep some jagged, but every now and then use a smoother line with slight indents.3418
See what I mean?

Cran
September 24th, 2012, 07:18 PM
I like the artwork. I think what's missing is a sense of scale - the shorelines suggest a high-stand sea level (ie, lowlands flooded) or islands at scales ranging from 1:25000 to 1:100000. I'm assuming the map is not the entire world, but only the region where the story is set.

Justinian
September 24th, 2012, 08:07 PM
This is one region. Also, I will try to round the edges more. Thanks :)

Cran
September 24th, 2012, 08:10 PM
Depending on the scale, you might not need to smooth the shorelines.

Justinian
September 24th, 2012, 09:33 PM
Length of the compass is 10 miles

Cran
September 24th, 2012, 09:51 PM
OK, so point to point on the compass represents 10 miles, how long is it on the page? 1 inch?
If so, then the scale = 1:633,600

Justinian
September 25th, 2012, 04:13 AM
how do you get that equation? Thats amazing

Kryptex
September 25th, 2012, 04:36 AM
I like it - it certainly surpasses any ability I have to put pen to paper and come up with something like that. I like the names too, they are intriguing & mysterious.

Cran
September 25th, 2012, 05:23 AM
how do you get that equation? Thats amazing
Well, there are 63, 360 inches in a mile; therefore 633, 600 inches in 10 miles.
That makes the ratio 1:633,600, assuming that 1 inch on the map represents 10 miles in the world.

Also, 1"=10mi is not an uncommon map ratio.

Potty
September 25th, 2012, 10:22 AM
Nah, Cran just has nothing better to do with his time than play with an abacus. I agree with Nox on this one, smooth out some of the edges. But it's a good effort. I have a stack of paper with attempts at drawing maps on. You're doing better than me.

Gumby
September 25th, 2012, 02:07 PM
Cran's mind is an amazing thing, isn't it? Not the first time he's blown me away with his abilities. :)

I like the map, but would agree that, at least in our world, the continents don't look so jagged, so it might make it more real in the readers mind of you smoothed them just a bit.

Cran
September 25th, 2012, 04:09 PM
Keep in mind that these are not continents; they are something like the Channel Islands or the Hebrides and a piece of mainland. That's what a scale of 1:633 600 means. At that scale, the map covers an area roughly 120 miles by 90 miles, or something like that portion of the Caribbean from Jamaica to Cuba to Haiti.

I imagine that more of Justinian's world will be revealed in the sequels.

Justinian
September 25th, 2012, 04:42 PM
Once I get photoshop again, Ill do it. My computer just broke down.

Nemesis
September 25th, 2012, 04:44 PM
Once I get photoshop again, Ill do it. My computer just broke down.

ugh computer crashes, the bane of my exsistance!

Justinian
September 25th, 2012, 04:59 PM
You'd think computer crashes would happen less often nowadays, but i guess not

vangoghsear
September 25th, 2012, 06:01 PM
It needs a sea serpent. Check out some old maps; they often show a sea serpent in open sea somewhere.

Google Image Result for http://www.nfld.com/archive/maps/7-t44.jpg (http://www.google.com/imgres?num=10&um=1&hl=en&client=firefox-a&sa=X&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=np&biw=1540&bih=813&tbm=isch&tbnid=2Db0rBmJ22XvdM:&imgrefurl=http://www.nfld.com/archive/&docid=sTLAoVh1CtkiPM&imgurl=http://www.nfld.com/archive/maps/7-t44.jpg&w=996&h=750&ei=fuJhULjLNenw0gGWo4GACQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=407&vpy=310&dur=2850&hovh=195&hovw=259&tx=161&ty=100&sig=109086023841629325413&page=1&tbnh=140&tbnw=186&start=0&ndsp=27&ved=1t:429,r:8,s:0,i:95)

Nemesis
September 25th, 2012, 06:02 PM
oh that'd be so cool!

Cran
September 25th, 2012, 06:06 PM
And warning signs?


Here be Monsters!

vangoghsear
September 25th, 2012, 06:10 PM
Actually Cran, I just read that in ancient times, the sea serpents were shown to indicate uncharted areas, so they were the warning signs. So the sea serpent would go near the Unknown Land.

Cran
September 25th, 2012, 06:15 PM
Not unknown, but uncharted land or sea.

Survivor or witness tales didn't count as charted.

vangoghsear
September 25th, 2012, 06:22 PM
I agree with you, Cran. The OP noted it as "Unknown Land". Uncharted is a better term I think.

Also, the shoreline surrounding that land mass should probably be smoother with less detail.

I like the artwork of the map very much, by the way Justinian.

Justinian
September 25th, 2012, 06:23 PM
Im trying to keep it simple. In my world, sea serpents don't exist. The major sea monster is the Filocian, which is able to both swim and fly. They usualy communicate before the traveler enters its waters that it is its territory.

Cran
September 25th, 2012, 07:02 PM
I agree with you, Cran. The OP noted it as "Unknown Land". Uncharted is a better term I think.

Also, the shoreline surrounding that land mass should probably be smoother with less detail. Yes, estimated or averaged shorelines were drawn for uncharted lands - inlets and embayments were not included if not properly surveyed (mapped).