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Tiamat
May 11th, 2012, 06:00 AM
I have a novel that I'm in the process of editing myself, as well as having a few beta readers give me some feedback, but I've been poking around the idea of hiring a professional editor to help me out. I've done a little bit of research--granted, not a whole lot--on the subject, and I was wondering if anyone out there had done this?

From what I've seen the prices can range anywhere from a couple hundred dollars to a couple thousand. And I gather that for the cost to fall on the lower end of the spectrum, it's usually just a proof-reading, rather than a comprehensive, professional editing. I like to think I and my beta readers are able to cover the things a proof reader would, like typos and grammatical errors, but as to content, pacing, flow and all of that, having written the book and spent countless hours poring over the words and ideas, I'm not sure I'm unbiased enough to handle that.

However, considering the price involved (and the fact that I work at a pet store and, therefore, am not exactly rolling in money), I wanted to know if anyone has experience with doing this. Is it worth the cost? Would you have any recommendations? Even for those who haven't tried it, would you consider it? Thoughts? Comments? Sarcasm? General tomfoolery?

Potty
May 11th, 2012, 06:35 AM
I use an editor, best thing I've ever done. The one I use works with a number of semi famous people and charges a good rate. A full novel edit would cost you a lot more than just a few hundred though, I would be wary of such a low price. If I remember correctly (Which I probably don't) the guy I use said he has like three stages, first it is a critique to work out the bugs in the story. then another stage that I can't remember, then when you both think it's the best it can be as a story it will get the edit.

Reasoning for this was something along the lines of "No point polishing a turd".

I use my guy to glance at my short stories if I'm sending them off to a competition that I really really want to win. Just to make sure I've got everything correct etc, he gives a lot of good feedback and I've learned a lot from having a professional give me his opinions. For a full edit on a short story I usually pay about 40, I've shopped around and most prices come at around this. I chose my guy because he made time for me, didn't feel like I was pestering him with my little jobs.

In a nut shell I would highly recomend it if you are planning to submit to agents, I'm certainly going too. If you're self publishing I would say it's a must.

Hope this helps

Kyle R
May 11th, 2012, 06:37 AM
I haven't done it yet, but I'd of course consider it.

Critique My Writing: Online Writing Critique Groups & Review Service | WritersDigestShop (http://www.writersdigestshop.com/writing-critique-service)

Is one of the first I'd investigate. From the testimonials it seems they assign your work to professional authors experienced in your genre, so that's definately a plus in my opinion.

Kyle R
May 11th, 2012, 06:48 AM
Although I forgot to mention the obvious: the posters in the Writer's Workshop here tend to give pretty constructive feedback... and it's free! :D

Potty
May 11th, 2012, 06:55 AM
Bit of a difference between feedback and a labourious edit

Kyle R
May 12th, 2012, 09:05 PM
Just post in the workshop and request a "line by line" laborious, professional edit.

See if you can sneak some freebies out of the users. :D

Tiamat
May 13th, 2012, 12:26 AM
A full novel edit would cost you a lot more than just a few hundred though, I would be wary of such a low price.
So what you're saying, basically, is that unless I sell everything I own and then take out a loan to cover the rest, I'm not going to be able to afford one. :P

I appreciate the advice though. It's something to think about, even if only to know that I'm gonna have to cross that particular item off my list. Maybe someday.

Potty
May 13th, 2012, 12:32 AM
This is a rough idea (it was a long time ago when I had the conversation with my editor) but I think he said something in the area of 4000 to get the book to a standard where an agent might not reject it out of hand. (Agents with probably have to edited another couple of times anyway)

It was between 2500 - 4000 anyway... something like that. Can't fully remember.

squidtender
May 13th, 2012, 04:10 AM
This subject has come up between a friend of mine recently (cool chick, kinda crazy), and we've been throwing around some ideas related to this. Since thousands of dollars is out of the question, then we were thinking maybe posting "editor wanted" at a local college, craigslist, maybe looking into local, smaller freelance editors to find a cheaper price. Just wondering if anyone has tried anything like this?
Potty, since you seem to have some knowledge about this, can you just pay for the editor to do only one of the stages? I don't need anyone to fix grammar or spelling for me, I really only want to know if there are any plot holes, problems with structure, things of that nature.

Potty
May 13th, 2012, 05:36 AM
my guy is really flexible. since he is independent he can do anything he likes. Some times I will just send him a story to see what he thinks and he will just charge me for the time it takes him to read and make a comment (which is next to nothing.) Other times I will ask for a full edit. some times I will just ask him to fix the spelling and nothing more. He charges for his time, he isn't really bothered what he is doing with it.

Potty
May 13th, 2012, 05:41 AM
I've just checked his website and it says "My rates are by agreement based on the needs of the individual writer. Depending on what suits best rates can be negotiated by the hour, day, page, or as a set price for a particular service."

But yea, he just does as he is asked.

squidtender
May 13th, 2012, 05:57 AM
But yea, he just does as he is asked.

Hmm. I wonder if that's normal for any editor. I guess you could keep the price to a minimum if you could narrow it down to just one thing. Also, if you could just have them edit certain scenes or chapters, that would make it cheaper as well

Tiamat
May 13th, 2012, 06:20 AM
So I decided to try Squid's idea and poke around on Craigslist a bit, just to see. I found one that is remarkably cheap ($425 for a full edit on a novel). The website lists his resume, a list published books that he's edited, a list of references, and so on and so forth. Being a bit of a skeptic, I'm wondering why his prices are so cheap if he's so good at his job. It's food for thought though, and if I decide to try this option out, I plan on calling all of his references first.

Olly Buckle
May 13th, 2012, 07:05 AM
I have a couple of friends who are, or were, editors. Recently other friends who have seen my writing have asked me for help, they have both written autobiographies, when i have mentioned this to my editor friends and said "I am not qualified" their response was "No one is".

There are no qualifications specifically for an editor, people tend to be judged by past performance, that makes beginners cheaper on the whole, they are trying to build a portfolio. It also means you are as qualified as anyone else, and from what I have seen have a reasonable ability too, why not look for work in the 'lower' end of editing, personal memoirs, family histories, things with a limited circulation. This would give you practice, confidence and a supplement to your pet shop earnings to employ someone on your own behalf if you still felt it necessary.

Tiamat
May 13th, 2012, 07:11 AM
That's an interesting idea, Olly. And to think of all the term papers, book reports, short stories, and novels I've edited for free--now that I know what some people charge that kind of thing! :P

The Backward OX
May 13th, 2012, 09:02 AM
Just post in the workshop and request a "line by line" laborious, professional edit.



You've been drinking the jungle juice again. When did anyone in a forum ever do as they were asked? :smile:

Olly Buckle
May 13th, 2012, 10:58 AM
That's an interesting idea, Olly. And to think of all the term papers, book reports, short stories, and novels I've edited for free--now that I know what some people charge FOR that kind of thing! :P
You are lucky, that's only a five cent word :)
Seriously, I have put nearly five hundred pounds in the bank this year, a useful supplement to the pension.

Tiamat
May 13th, 2012, 04:31 PM
Ha! Not a bad idea at all. :)

Baron
May 13th, 2012, 04:41 PM
This site is UK based but it may interest you.

Training | Freelances | Standards | Society for Editors and Proofreaders (http://www.sfep.org.uk/)

Tiamat
May 13th, 2012, 07:50 PM
Hey, that's a pretty helpful site. Thanks, Captain!

Offeiriad
May 14th, 2012, 03:26 PM
I have a couple of friends who are, or were, editors. Recently other friends who have seen my writing have asked me for help, they have both written autobiographies, when i have mentioned this to my editor friends and said "I am not qualified" their response was "No one is".


When I worked as an editor years ago, the friend who got me the job was editing and her background was insurance. If you don't have a degree in English or even journalism, all you need to do is buy a few grammar textbooks.

Loulou
May 14th, 2012, 04:14 PM
Tiamat my dear, I'd say don't. You are a strong enough writer to sort out grammar and nits and stuff. With regards pacing and the such, again an able writer like you can do that. I'd say let your book breathe. That is put it away for a few months. Then come back afresh. It's amazing what you see with new eyes. That's how I edited my novels, a few times over. I absolutely cannot understand any writer parting with thousands of pounds for an editor to do what they can and should be able to do themselves. Plus it makes no practical sense - an advance for a novel these days, should it be lucky enough to be picked up by a publisher, is generally no more than a few thousand. And that's the big publishers too. So why lay out what you might never even get back? A writer who expects to make a career out of it should learn their craft. And that means editing as well as writing. I wouldn't want someone else to do it for me. Might as well roll up my sleeves and learn the hard way.

Loulou
May 14th, 2012, 04:19 PM
I use my guy to glance at my short stories if I'm sending them off to a competition that I really really want to win. Just to make sure I've got everything correct etc, he gives a lot of good feedback and I've learned a lot from having a professional give me his opinions. For a full edit on a short story I usually pay about 40, I've shopped around and most prices come at around this. I chose my guy because he made time for me, didn't feel like I was pestering him with my little jobs.

In a nut shell I would highly recomend it if you are planning to submit to agents, I'm certainly going too. If you're self publishing I would say it's a must.

Hope this helps

Of course your guy made time for you - you're paying him!

But seriously if a writer can't even edit their own short story, then I genuinely and seriously don't understand the point in them writing them? I'm really baffled. How hard is it to edit say 2000 words? Seems unfair anyway to enter a competition with a piece that had paid 'help.'

Potty
May 14th, 2012, 06:00 PM
How hard is it to edit say 2000 words?

For me? Pretty hard. I go through my work with a fine tooth comb and I still miss errors. Maybe I'm a little dysle...dislecks... can't think like you guys. My editor doesn't do my work for me, he just provides the education I missed while at school. I'm looking into English courses so there may come a time when I don't need him, but for now I need someone to tell me where I've made mistakes. He isn't just my editor, he is also a mentor (but as you say, so long as I keep paying him). It's help I need and I'm not ashamed to admit it :D


Of course your guy made time for you - you're paying him!

Ah, by this I meant he didn't get impatient with my general noobishness. Had a couple of prospective people talk to me like a minor annoyance.


Seems unfair anyway to enter a competition with a piece that had paid 'help.'

Again, I'm not asking him to write the story for me, just glance over it and make sure I'm not going to get rejected out of hand for some silly mistake that I should have caught myself. It's no different to asking a friend look over your stories. Only minor difference is the guy I ask has a better grasp of English over my friends.

I was wondering when this would turn into a "You don't need one" "Yes you do!" discussion :D

Everyone needs and editor at some stage in their writing career. The book you've had accepted by your agent will no doubt get several edits from professionals before it's sent to a publisher. It's just personal choice/own limitations that govern at what stage you employ one.

Baron
May 14th, 2012, 06:27 PM
I've been in this discussion before so I'm stating neutral on the "do you or don't you need" position. It about individual ability and confidence. Some of you may find this article interesting.

I am your editor | Writing | Caro Clarke - writer (http://www.caroclarke.com/iamyoureditor.html)

Terry D
May 14th, 2012, 08:28 PM
I've been in this discussion before so I'm stating neutral on the "do you or don't you need" position. It about individual ability and confidence. Some of you may find this article interesting.

I am your editor | Writing | Caro Clarke - writer (http://www.caroclarke.com/iamyoureditor.html)

Nice link, Baron. I popped in there and didn't leave until I'd read three of her articles. Good, pragmatic stuff!

Oh, and about hiring an editor; I know my book/story will get its turn under the knife before it gets published, but the only person I want suggesting changes, or restructuring, is the person who will be paying me for those changes. Getting someone to proof is fine, as are beta readers, but not a full edit. That's between me and my publisher. Just my opinion.

justbishop
May 14th, 2012, 08:32 PM
Nice link, Baron. I popped in there and didn't leave until I'd read three of her articles. Good, pragmatic stuff!

Oh, and about hiring an editor; I know my book/story will get its turn under the knife before it gets published, but the only person I want suggesting changes, or restructuring, is the person who will be paying me for those changes. Getting someone to proof is fine, as are beta readers, but not a full edit. That's between me and my publisher. Just my opinion.

What is the consensus on this if you're self-publishing? I'm leaning that way, and am torn between paying a pro for style/plot editing (which we really can't afford right now), and just having several good beta-readers go through it.

One of the beta readers I have in mind would also point out any and all spelling/grammatical errors, I'm sure.

Potty
May 14th, 2012, 08:41 PM
Personally if I was self publishing I would find me a proffesional. But as previously mentioned, this is becuase I have gaps in my education and I need someone to fill those in.

If you're super confident in your own ability and everyone you send the story too agree it's something special. I see no reason to pay for an edit if you're self publishing. I regret that this is an option closed to me :(

Terry D
May 14th, 2012, 09:17 PM
What is the consensus on this if you're self-publishing? I'm leaning that way, and am torn between paying a pro for style/plot editing (which we really can't afford right now), and just having several good beta-readers go through it.

One of the beta readers I have in mind would also point out any and all spelling/grammatical errors, I'm sure.

When self publishing it might come down to a financial decision. The vast majority of self published books make very little money, so the cost of the pro-edit could easily out weigh the potential profit. If you intent is to put considerable time and resources into marketing a self published book with the goal of financial success, then I think a professional editor would be a good idea. There are few books which do not benefit from the eyes and blue-pencil of a pro.

If publishing traditionally, that editor will work for the publishing house who considers your work. My book went through several beta readers, and uncountable edits by me before I self published, and even though it has been well received by readers, I'm sure a professional edit would help. My goal wasn't to sell thousands of books (that would be nice though!), it was to get the book into the hands of readers for feedback. I couldn't justify spending more for an edit than the book will ever make through its limited distribution.

justbishop
May 14th, 2012, 09:24 PM
When self publishing it might come down to a financial decision. The vast majority of self published books make very little money, so the cost of the pro-edit could easily out weigh the potential profit. If you intent is to put considerable time and resources into marketing a self published book with the goal of financial success, then I think a professional editor would be a good idea. There are few books which do not benefit from the eyes and blue-pencil of a pro.

If publishing traditionally, that editor will work for the publishing house who considers your work. My book went through several beta readers, and uncountable edits by me before I self published, and even though it has been well received by readers, I'm sure a professional edit would help. My goal wasn't to sell thousands of books (that would be nice though!), it was to get the book into the hands of readers for feedback. I couldn't justify spending more for an edit than the book will ever make through its limited distribution.

Thank you for the info! It's nice to know that the idea of skipping a professional edit is not completely insane. I'm still very torn on whether or not to submit my piece to publishers. I know that long novelettes/short novellas like the one I'm finishing up are a hard sell, and I don't think I want it lumped into a collection or anthology.

I'm definitely not in it for the cash, it would just be nice if people (other than my friends and family) found a few hours of enjoyment from what I've written. A little yarn money now and then would be a nice bonus, though ;)

Bookkus
May 15th, 2012, 04:32 AM
I really think if you dig through these forums and some of the other writing forums you can find some really good editors.
If you have any short stories hanging around you can always get them to edit the short story as a sort of interview to ensure they are good. Or read their past work.
I agree with the costs of a pro outweighing the earnings of self-publishing. If you don't have that kind of cash hanging around you might want to join a writers group. That's how my dad did most of his editing.

Loulou
May 15th, 2012, 08:32 AM
Maybe I'm a little dysle...dislecks... can't think like you guys. My editor doesn't do my work for me, he just provides the education I missed while at school. I'm looking into English courses so there may come a time when I don't need him, but for now I need someone to tell me where I've made mistakes. He isn't just my editor, he is also a mentor (but as you say, so long as I keep paying him). It's help I need and I'm not ashamed to admit it :D

Again, I'm not asking him to write the story for me, just glance over it and make sure I'm not going to get rejected out of hand for some silly mistake that I should have caught myself. It's no different to asking a friend look over your stories. Only minor difference is the guy I ask has a better grasp of English over my friends.

I was wondering when this would turn into a "You don't need one" "Yes you do!" discussion :D

Everyone needs and editor at some stage in their writing career. The book you've had accepted by your agent will no doubt get several edits from professionals before it's sent to a publisher. It's just personal choice/own limitations that govern at what stage you employ one.

Sorry to hear you have trouble, might be a bit dyslexic. But truly, you don't need to pay. That's my beef. Not editing, but paying. Post work in the Workshop - people give lots of help. Ask friends?

Of course everyone needs editing. But we should learn to do it ourselves first, or no publisher will even bother later. So many people want an easy option. All books we buy are edited. But they were done for nothing, by the publisher. I will say again, what the hell is the point in spending a couple of thousand pounds on an editing service, that can do no better job than you can if you learn, when you're never likely to make even half of that back on a book? It just makes no sense. None.

My book wasn't edited by my agent. It is with publishers now exactly as it was when I submitted it. And I truly believe that is because I edited it about ten times, probably more, letting it breathe in between, being harsh with it, getting friends to look at it, family. I worked and worked and worked and worked on it. Anyone can use the excuse of no education. Mine is limited. I never went to university. Only got a handful of GCSEs.

To be harsh, if we can't write (and that means editing too) then we can't hope to have a writing career. Of course, some people are writing for pleasure. And that's great. It's a wonderful, engaging and therapeutic hobby. But if that's the case there's no need to pay for an editor anyway.

Tiamat
May 16th, 2012, 03:59 PM
Well, I have to say, Loulou's comments on the subject had me pretty much convinced that hiring an editor seems like a waste of money. But even though I figured she was right, I decided to try one more thing first: I requested a free sample edit.

In the ten pages or so that were edited, there were only a few red marks. And by "few," I mean that there were only about a half a dozen total. Then--and this is my favorite part--the editor who did the sample recommended that I pay for the exclusive $1,600 package, saying that she feels it would benefit my work immensely.

How does that saying go? "Don't call us; we'll call you." Yeah...

Offeiriad
May 16th, 2012, 04:03 PM
Not every freelance editor is going to be like that and it's unfair to lump them all in the same pot. I certainly wouldn't appreciate being lumped into the same category as that person.

Potty
May 16th, 2012, 04:06 PM
I agree with offeiriad. I sent out 10 sample edits. Some of which were just silly in what they wanted as payment. I finally settled on one who charged fairly and seems nice to boot. Won't change him for anything now.

That is of course if you feel you want one. But as lou says, if you have the ability, why pay someone to tell you stuff you already know?

Tiamat
May 17th, 2012, 02:16 AM
I see your point, Potty, and I appreciate the advice. But really, from what I've read, $1600 isn't an unfair price for a full edit on a 95,000 word manuscript. In fact, it falls right in the middle of the prices I've been quoted. And granted, I realize it was only a free sample, which is never as good as the paid-in-full product, but the changes that were made to my manuscript were things I really think I can handle on my own.

Plus, it's not like I'll never have the option to hire an editor if I don't do it right now. So, in the interest of being a poor person, I've decided to save my money, do the best I can with what I've got, and give it a try. If I'm rejected enough times (and by enough, I mean several dozen rejections and several re-edits of my own), then perhaps I'll reconsider. Perhaps.

Thank you though. :)

Potty
May 17th, 2012, 02:20 AM
If that's what works for you :D I wasn't trying to sell you the idea thought it might have sounded like it!

I wish I had your skill to self edit!

Kyle R
May 17th, 2012, 02:30 AM
I wish I had your skill to self edit!

I had that same mindset up until a few months ago, as I tended to simply write a piece and then slap it up in the workshop as soon as I typed the last period.

Then LouLou made an interesting comment. Let me see if I can find it...

Ah, here it is:


editing is all part of this thing we do, and something that we learn only by doing

What you can take away from that little pearl of widsom is that editing is a skill, just like writing. The more you do it, the better you get at it.

PS: I've hidden a mistake somewhere in this post! Ten EDITOR POINTS if you can find it! :D

Potty
May 17th, 2012, 02:36 AM
I had that same mindset up until a few months ago, as I tended to simply write a piece and then slap it up in the workshop as soon as I typed the last period (Some dodgey way of spelling 'Full Stop').

Then LouLou made an interesting comment. Let me see if I can find it...

Ah, here it is:



What you can take away from that little pearl of widsom (Wisdom.) is that editing is a skill, just like writing. The more you do it, the better you get at it.

PS: I've hidden a mistake somewhere in this post! Ten EDITOR POINTS if you can find it! :D

God I feel like I'm back at school... but I'll bite! I saw two errors!

Tiamat
May 17th, 2012, 03:09 AM
I had that same mindset up until (double preposition--frowned on, waste of words) a few months ago, as I tended to simply write (split infinitive) a piece and then slap it up in (double preposition again) the workshop as soon as I typed the last period.

Then LouLou made an interesting comment. Let me see if I can find it...

Ah, here it is:



What you can take away from that little pearl of widsom (wisdom) is that editing is a skill, just like writing. The more you do it, the better you get at it.

PS: I've hidden a mistake somewhere in this post! Ten EDITOR POINTS if you can find it! :D

;)

Potty
May 17th, 2012, 03:14 AM
Kyle got owned by tia! Burn!

Potty
May 17th, 2012, 03:21 AM
Once, a friend walked in on me while I had a knife in hand, standing over a bunch of shredded papers screaming, "You shall not pass!"



Like it.

Don't get me wrong, I too enjoy the editing process, I'm just not very good at it. As Tia showed very clearly, she picked up on two points in Kyles post that I would have never spotted, even when instructed by Kyle to look out for mistakes. I combed that post for anything to pick him up on and missed two (Glaringly obvious thanks to Tia) mistakes that someone with a better ability was able to pick up on.

Hence my need for an editor. I can try my hardest (and my editor recognises this which is why I think he is so patient with me) but still miss some obvious things.

Kyle R
May 17th, 2012, 03:34 AM
;)

Lol! I said find the intentional mistake, not correct my vernacular! :D

Tiamat
May 17th, 2012, 03:57 AM
Just proving mah point! :P

Kyle R
May 17th, 2012, 06:36 AM
Yeah, yeah. *Kicks your bottom* :x

Why don't you post chapter one in the workshop? :D

squidtender
May 17th, 2012, 12:55 PM
Hmmm. After seeing Tia prose serve KC (dude, she owned you hard), I'm thinking about hiring her as my editor. I pay in back rubs and compliments:coffeescreen:

Tiamat
May 17th, 2012, 04:06 PM
Why don't you post chapter one in the workshop? :D
I intend to, when I'm satisfied I can't do anything else with it on my own. :)


Hmmm. After seeing Tia prose serve KC (dude, she owned you hard), I'm thinking about hiring her as my editor. I pay in back rubs and compliments:coffeescreen:
That is unfortunate, my friend. Because I accept payment only in dinosaur bones. I might give you a special discount though. Maybe.

Kyle R
May 17th, 2012, 06:15 PM
Hmmm. After seeing Tia prose serve KC (dude, she owned you hard), I'm thinking about hiring her as my editor. I pay in back rubs and compliments:coffeescreen:

Lol. In my defense, first person narration should, uhh, be exempt from the laws of grammar. Yeah, something like that! :cower:

Also, I just found a NaNo related editing site: NaNoEdMo!?

http://www.nanoedmo.net/

PaulMcElligott
May 30th, 2012, 11:21 PM
So what you're saying, basically, is that unless I sell everything I own and then take out a loan to cover the rest, I'm not going to be able to afford one. :P
If you are ambitious, you can always set up a Kickstarter campaign to raise the money to pay the editor. You might have to give away a few copies of the book as premiums and put some effort into the campaign, but it's an option.

sunaynaprasad
May 31st, 2012, 01:19 PM
I have hired professional editors too. Sometimes, I have good experiences, sometimes I don't. Read testimonials and see what other people thought. Sometimes, they can do a free sample edit.

FirstTimeNovelist
June 25th, 2012, 11:10 PM
I would strongly consider an editor only if I intended to get my work publish. My grammar is weak, and I'm writing a novel, so I would probably invest in a decent one.

Galen
June 25th, 2012, 11:49 PM
For me? Pretty hard. I go through my work with a fine tooth comb and I still miss errors. Maybe I'm a little dysle...dislecks... can't think like you guys. My editor doesn't do my work for me, he just provides the education I missed while at school. I'm looking into English courses so there may come a time when I don't need him, but for now I need someone to tell me where I've made mistakes. He isn't just my editor, he is also a mentor (but as you say, so long as I keep paying him). It's help I need and I'm not ashamed to admit it :D



Ah, by this I meant he didn't get impatient with my general noobishness. Had a couple of prospective people talk to me like a minor annoyance.



Again, I'm not asking him to write the story for me, just glance over it and make sure I'm not going to get rejected out of hand for some silly mistake that I should have caught myself. It's no different to asking a friend look over your stories. Only minor difference is the guy I ask has a better grasp of English over my friends.

I was wondering when this would turn into a "You don't need one" "Yes you do!" discussion :D

Everyone needs and editor at some stage in their writing career. The book you've had accepted by your agent will no doubt get several edits from professionals before it's sent to a publisher. It's just personal choice/own limitations that govern at what stage you employ one.

Potty -- I think you have proven that every writer has to make their own decisions about editing and you have found a method that works for you.

I think Tia has opened a useful discussion about options for editing your work. Thanks.


http://www.zoominto.com/zoomapi/ZoomButt.gif

PatriotsNation4
July 11th, 2012, 02:48 PM
Do you ever get the paranoid feeling that revealing a good idea in your novel to an editor could get it stolen?

Loulou
July 11th, 2012, 03:16 PM
Do you ever get the paranoid feeling that revealing a good idea in your novel to an editor could get it stolen?

Editors are editors not writers, so it's unlikely they would use your idea. Plus they're professionals. It wouldn't be worth their reputation to do such a thing.

PatriotsNation4
July 11th, 2012, 04:56 PM
I realize that they are editors. I'm talking about feelings and not logic. Do you ever worry a good idea might get stolen?

Potty
July 11th, 2012, 05:21 PM
If Im sending stuff off to an editor who has credentials, no not really. To me a good idea is something rubbish to someone else. An example:

"What do you do in your spare time?"
"I write."
"Oh! Have you been published?"
"A Short story and a couple of newspaper articles."
"We should get together me and you."
"Oh, do you write as well?"
"No but I have a good story to tell, it's all about me!"
"Sounds... great. What makes it a good story?"
"It's about how I grew up when there wasn't much money about and how I made my own way in the world and became a sucsess."

An actual conversation that I had while changing the incontience pad of a 46 yar old male. Obviously not that much of a sucsess. Never the less, to her the story was golden and she guarded it as such. To me it was sinfully boring and I was lucky to get out of that with my love of writing intact. HOWEVER! Should she turn out to be a decent writer herself, her story might end up on the best seller list as she has written that idea with the love and emotion that she feels for it. If I had written it, it would have been two dimentional and cheap.

So could someone steal my idea? Yes, it could happen... but I'm already miles ahead in the writing process of the story and the chances are it would be way better that the thiefs anyway.

philistine
July 11th, 2012, 06:46 PM
I'd probably never do it to be honest.

I'm incredibly severe concerning the standard of my writing, in all aspects, so would likely not even consider such a prospect unless I had exhausted every option possible. It's unlikely that I'd become that stuck on a piece, though.

WriterJohnB
July 12th, 2012, 01:33 PM
I freelance edit at a site called e-lance. An author can put his editing job up for bids, set a price range and several editors will make bids. There are a lot of other sites like that.

An editor doesn't have to be expensive to be good. I feel I'm a good editor and my tested skills on that site bear me out, as well as numerous testimonials. I keep my prices low because I only edit in my spare time to make extra money to promote my novels. It's worked out well for me.


JohnB

MJCaan
July 19th, 2012, 03:50 AM
I've been having the same thoughts lately...whether to hire an editor and how much do I want them to do. It seems that basic editing, spelling and grammar, isn't terribly expensive. But if you want a full blown job doen, with critiques and structure...it can run fairly high. Just not sure what level of service is realyl needed.

Potty
July 19th, 2012, 06:14 AM
No matter what I do, I always ask for a critique. Don't like flying blind.

Kyle R
July 19th, 2012, 06:49 AM
Would you guys (and gals) pay money to have a professional edit of a short story? Or do you think it's only worth the cash for a more lengthy work?

Potty
July 19th, 2012, 07:03 AM
Yes I would and have.

Juganhuy
July 19th, 2012, 08:42 PM
I want to get an editor for the book I am writing now. I mean, it would be my first book that I would activly distribute so I want it as polished as possible. I just do not want to pay someone to spell check, I want someone to nit pick and go back and forth with me.

Alas, I do not have much money. I may try and get my aunt that is an English teacher to scan through it but I know it would take forever. I am about 85% done so I need to make a decsion. i will be done next week and I already have the cover art taken care of by my cousin.

David B. Ramirez
July 25th, 2012, 07:20 PM
I would say that if someone is self-publishing, not to spend on an editor until sales have produced enough money to hire a decent one. And if going the traditional route, not to spend on an editor at all--just rely on workshops/writing groups.

The reason I say this is that sometimes, books just don't sell. I could polish the same book for 5 years with or without an editor and it still just might not work. After editing help and feedback from a good group, a book should have enough polish so that it can either make it through the slush pile on its own, or it won't, in which case one would be better served by moving on and writing another book to put through its paces. If you get a good agent, he or she will help you edit it before putting it on submission, and if you get a deal, your editor will go through more stages of editing it.

In the self-publish case, I feel it's a similar situation. You don't want to put serious money into it until your base skills start bringing in enough to cover the costs of a good editor. Spending a few bucks on a cover is one thing, but spending on hundreds to thousands on a book that may not ever cover its cost? Not wise.

One of the people I know who started out writing fanfics moved on to self-publishing. This person spent very little at first, but now that the sales are earning in the thousands of dollars, it's very much worth the cost for a freelance editor.

Juganhuy
July 28th, 2012, 06:34 AM
I just hired one on elance for 150$. I probably will not make it back but I know that it will be better coming out than in. Will look nice on my shelf.

D. Ayers Gray
July 31st, 2012, 11:47 PM
All I say is be careful. Last guy I had only didn't part of the work. He bailed after the third payment. Then cussed me out on top of it. Just saying, be careful.